Author Topic: AGS Questionaire!  (Read 27006 times)

Andail

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #40 on: 28 Mar 2006, 15:47 »
Name: Andail. Real name: Petter Ljungqvist

Age: 25. 26 in November.

Female/male: Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?

Since June 2001. That was some months after I downloaded AGS and started making my first game.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

Police Quest was my very first game. After that I created paper based adventure games regularly which we played in school. Years and years later it struck me that it might now be possible to easily create such games with special programs.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

It's an extremely helpful and benevolent atmosphere. I wouldn't have joined the community if I had had to pay.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

It varies. In periods I'm at the forums every day, and chat with ags-members every night. Then there can be long periods without any activity at all. Ever since I released my last game years ago, I have no need for technical support or feedback.
I attend most of the real life meetings, and have partaken in all mittens so far, as well as hosted one.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want

Yes, I released three games within a year, and even though they were not very good, this was when games generally were of much lower quality than these days, so I guess they were pretty appreciated.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

Extremely little. I've never been very interested in programming, and the only game creation I indulged in was based on pens and papers.


c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

No. I experimented a bit with some basic programming language with my first pc back in 87-88, but that was very briefly.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

Not really. The idea of trying to sell games has crossed my mind. I possess many of the necessary qualities, except for the entrepreneur part.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

Only that males outnumber females by 5 to 1 or more. 

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

I try to, but I'm likely to look at it differently. We have a lot of preconcieved notions when it comes to genders. I try to be neutral, though.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

Don't know really. Women tend not to pick up programming as readily as men do, by way of traditions. If so, it might invite them to do stuff they hadn't done otherwise. Which goes for most male users as well, of course.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

The few games I played made by women have been extremely impressive. "Mom's Quest" happens to be one of my favourite ags games so far. I just love it. Then again, I have a rather odd taste for games, sometimes.

11. Any other comments?

I'm simply happy to have stumbled across the AGS. My life is about searching for creative outlets.
Since game creating involves both art and music, as well as plot writing and programming, it's the ultimate creative project.

Radiant

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #41 on: 28 Mar 2006, 19:53 »
1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
About two years.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
Because it was there, really. I had been a game designer for a long time and came upon some adventure games and thought, hey, I can make a game like this. Then I found out AGS was the engine used, and that it worked well and flexibly so, so I turned up here.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I'm not sure it's relevant, I've seen similar communities spring up around several shareware or commercial game design tools. Plain fact is that communities spring up around good tools, and most tools aren't good so they don't get much interest. They don't feel substantially different. One point of note is that here, people like and respect CJ a lot, and for some other communities I've seen people with strong dislike of the author of their tool. But that may also be caused by CJ simply being a nice guy.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
I read the messageboard daily (more often when I'm bored) and intend to go to *ittens. It's nice but I do have more important things y'know.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Yes: META, MOTLPAA, HOIK and ATOTK. Also, Radiant FontEdit. Do you like TLAs? :)

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:
a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yes. Four published titles to my name beforehand.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
Yes, mainly in Visual C++, some older work in Basic. The experience doesn't differ much really. In VC++ I write my own graphic libraries, in AGS they already exist. But using them is not essentially different.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
No, I was already a professional before.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
I feel that, as with most online communities, about 90% of the people here are male (and European/American, and late teens or tweens). I don't see a gender divide as such, no. People are likely assumed to be male unless they indicate otherwise, but that's hardly a divide.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
No. I judge games on their merit, not on who made them (I do, however, somewhat judge people on what they make). In my experience girls/women are (substantially) less likely to take up game design or any kind of programming, but those that do are better at it than the average boy/man.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Not especially. AGS makes it easier for people in general to get involved in computer game design. I see no indication that the percentage of female designers is higher in the AGS community than anywhere else.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
See question eight. Otherwise, in the mainstream market there probably would be; but people turning up for AGS coding are sufficiently geeky ('cusezlemot) that this would be less than obvious.

11. Any other comments?
Maybe, I'll think on it.

Seleceus

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #42 on: 28 Mar 2006, 21:54 »
Name:
Jim Everett

Age:
39++

Female/male:
Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I stopped a year-long lurk just over 2 years ago.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
Game design, drawing, and story writing were already separate hobbies of mine.  This type of forum seemed a natural fit.  But the thing that made AGS the 'one' was the general community attitude.  I haven't seen a more encouraging, or constructive, Critics Lounge ANYWHERE!  Amateurs can post their creations without fear of all-out attack.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
With money comes a hidden agenda.  Always!  It's human nature.  But by this product, and more importantly the support, being free to use, it tends to give us a better cross-section of people along with their talents, and ideas.  When there's little chance of theft, sharing becomes a much easier thing to do.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
I poke around daily, although I don't post much.  I've made it part of my morning routine, along with checking the news and weather.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
I have one project, in the works, that's not yet ready for the Announcement forum.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:
     a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
     Yes, I was.  I started with pencil/paper/dice games, to board/card, and actually some old Doom levels.

     b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?
     NA

     c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the experience differ?
     Not computer-based, so there's no real comparison.

     d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
     No, I already work as a database programmer.  I'll keep the game design enjoyable, thanks.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
Not at all.  I've been lucky enough to have never read a disparaging remark about gender, nationality, or personal philosophy here.  Hopefully, I never will.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
No.  And with most games produced under nicknames, it's all-but impossible to really tell anyway.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
I feel it makes it easier for everyone.  Why?  Silly questionaire.  Just by being here you've answered your own query.  People here tend to listen...(most of the time)

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
No more so than games made by people of different ages, or different cultures.  So I suppose; Yes there must be, but I'll be damned if I can tell them apart.

11. Any other comments?
Not at this time.
Insert cliche here  ->         <-

monkey0506

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #43 on: 29 Mar 2006, 01:50 »
Name: Michael Rittenhouse (monkey_05_06)

Age: 18 (in 7 days).

Female/male: Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?

767+ days.  (19 February 2004 to 28 March 2006 as a registered user, lurker days not included)

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

I really want to make video games.  Computers are pretty much my life.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

Freeware, especially good freeware (like AGS), is the best!  Personally, I don't like to spend money on stuff.  I'd much rather have it all given to me.  And when you get high quality stuff like AGS for free...that's tops.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

Recently its role has declined (mainly due to embarassment over a certain nameless module that was released too soon, and has never actually worked, and I can't really seem to make work), although it is a major part of my life.  I spend probably between 10 and 15 hours a week just on the forums.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS (You may list them if you want)?

I have not yet been involved in developing any completed games (I don't think this counts...).

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

Yes, I was.  Years before I found AGS I asked my brother what the best way to make a video game was, and he told me C++.  I actually have learned some C++, but with the amount of work Chris has done on AGS, the support of the forums, and the ease of the scripting, I'll make at least a few games with AGS first :D (although...that could take some time :P)

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

(N/A)

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

I have used WinterMute, Klik N Play, The Games Factory, and AGAST (in the search for the ultimate engine) and found all of them difficult for a "newbie" to start using.  KnP is supposed to be simple, but I honestly couldn't figure it out (too simplistic perhaps?).  TGF seems more directed at arcade-style games, which wasn't what I was looking for.  AGAST is entirely script based, which to a scripting-n00b (which I was at the time), is rather daunting and difficult to use.  WinterMute.  Well...let's just say we didn't get along.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

Inspired me, per se, no, however, it has fueled the fire.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

Hmm...difficult to say.  I think there are probably a majority of male members, however the number of female members aren't exactly small.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

I think the only difference might be the way some aspects of the game are perceived.  I can't think of a good example at the moment, but there are definitely things that, maybe, you would expect a male to say/write but not a female (and vice-versa).  But that would be the extent of it.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

I think AGS makes it easier for everyone to get involved in computer game design, regardless of sex.  It's one of the simplest ways I've found of taking some ideas, plugging them into the computer, and making a game out of it (although I may not have necessarily done this yet).

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

No.  Not really.

11. Any other comments?

I'm rather hungry.  I think I'll go eat now.

an AGS rookie

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #44 on: 06 Apr 2006, 21:57 »
Name: Tony Burlin
 
Age: 20, soon to be 21

Female/male: male
 
question 1: I,ve been using AGS and downloaded games from  this site for a little less than a year but it,s no longer than a month or two since i started to seriously read the forums and actually post replies here.

question 2: I read about some games which were made with AGS and since i had long had a dream about making my own adventure-games and not just play them i searched for it on the net and decided to give it a try. (I don,t regret that decision one milli-fraction of a second :).)

question 3: I think it has affected the community a lot! This site wouldn,t probably be half as big or half as good if AGS wasn,t freeware. (i for example wouldn,t be  using AGS if you had to pay for it.) I think it encourages also people with only the sligthest bit of interest in game-making since you don,t have to risk feeling you have thrown away your money for nothing if you didn,t like the program.

question 4: Since i started to read and post in the forums, i would say it plays a large part. I read the forums almost every day and i try to post at least one reply every week. ( I plan to register myself as a member to.)

question 5: I am working on my first ever game with AGS.

question 6a: I was definitelly interested in game-design before i found AGS. I was not however interested in scripting until i started to use AGS.

question 6b: Probably not. I wouldn,t have been encouraged to keep trying if the program hadn,t been so simple and user-friendly. Seeing so many good games made by other amateur-enthusiasts is also very helpfull.

question 6c: Nope. AGS is so far the only game-engine i have used.

question 6d: I,m definitely hoping to be able to convert all my ideas (or at least some) into proffesinoall games with awesome graphics, voice-acting and all that stuff some time in the future. But actually doing it for a job? :-\ . I don,t think so. (having your passion as a living doesn,t always mix i think.)

question 7: Not what i,ve noticed, no.

question 8: None at all.

question 9: I think AGS makes it easier for females and males to get into game design as long you are motivated enough.

question 10: Not what i can think of.

question 11. Nope.

Krysis

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #45 on: 06 Apr 2006, 22:17 »
Name: Krasimir Savov A.K.A. Relentless

Age: 21.

Female/male: Last time I checked I was Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?

A year or so...

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

Its something I allways wanted to do, and it is fun.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

I love it. People here rule.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

I check the forums dayly and I read allmost every new tread.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS (You may list them if you want)?

I have tryed to make games by myself and I've failed each time... But I did make the artwork for mozza's latest game that is not released yet.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

Indeed. I've tryed RPG Maker and Game Maker but now AGS is my favorite.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

I have no idea.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

AGS is the only tool I need for now.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

I doubt anyone would care if I do...

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

I respect girl members (Um... that sounds so stupid). In the forum boys and girls are equal. All you get is a handle, an avatar and a signature... We are all people. 

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

I doubt it. Games are games.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

AGS is a program that can be used by both genders.  ;D

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

Some girls make better games.

11. Any other comments?

"I am your Father!" "Yeah, right!"

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #46 on: 06 Apr 2006, 23:10 »
Name: Peder Johnsen

Age: 18

Female/male: Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
First got involved with AGS in 2001, but diddent registrer on the forum untill 2003.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
I remember I wanted to make my own Adventure game, and searched for a way to make it.
And somehow I found AGS.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I think this is GREAT! I mean, it gives EVERYONE a chance to make their own game on a easy way for FREE!

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
The AGS community never been a really big part of my life before early this year, cause of me being busy with school, homework, playing in bands, etc.
In other words I had to many things to do for it to be a big part of my life.
It is alot bigger part now than it was before.
I go on the forum as much as I can, post posts where I got something to say, I try to make games, I recently been making some entries for different competitions.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Yes, since 2001 I been trying to make a few games, but gave up on most of them cause of being to busy with other stuff.
But in 2004 I finnished my first game, "Trapped in a Building".
Never really got much feedback on it, but it was pretty crappy, or as someone said "The game is one big bug." and it was!
After that I was working alot on a game, but that I gave up on cause of lack of story.
I then decided to make a fan game with Lucas Arts GFX, from the games: Sam & Max, Monkey Island and Day of the Tentacle.
I called the game "Where did Sam go?" and was a short but for me a fun game.
I basically made this game to get to know the last version of AGS better.
When I had finnished that game I decided to enter the MAGS competition.
And on 27th of March 2006 my entry "Fallen Angel" with all original art and SFX was finnished. I won the competition and I am now doing another entry for this months MAGS just for fun.
I also got plans for other games.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yes I was, ever since I tried Beneath a Steel Sky and the Monkey Island games I got really interested in games, and even before that when my brothers bought a Sega Master System (old console) I got really interested in games. And since then I allways wanted to make my own games.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
No I do not use any other programs as I havent found any other programs I like.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
Yes it has.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
I would not think so, havent noticed anything.
It is probably more males here, but I seen quite alot of females here to!

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Not at all. Even though the games MIGHT be different in different ways (language etc.) I would not think of saying a game is crap just cause a female made it.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Yes, but then again it also makes it easier for males to get involved, cause not all males are that interested in computers and learn computer things that easy. But most females I know of arent that "into" computer things like programming , websites etc, stuff like that, but most males I know are.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Well, I think some females might do things different than a male would do, but then again some males probably would to.
So I think there allways will be differences between games made by males, games made by females and games made by males and females.

11. Any other comments?
"May the Blue Cup be with you"
« Last Edit: 06 Apr 2006, 23:12 by Peder Johnsen »

Layabout

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #47 on: 21 Apr 2006, 13:00 »
Name: Ryan P Keepence, AKA, Layabout, Lay, Captain Urinal, Pirate Jack, Dickhead...

Age: 24

Female/male: Male.

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I joined Febuary 4th 2000 to the ezboard forums. Probably lurked for a bit before then.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
My first experiences with PC games were the Kings Quest series, when I was about 8. Since then, I've always loved them and wanted to make one to call my own... Something seriously went wrong somewhere.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
AGS has a great community spirit, a love for adventure games. These people like something that they can't really otherwise get in the shops. The fact that it is freeware has allowed the community grow in such a way. AGS is so well known today, due to it's continued coverage in the media. I think people would pay for it today, as opposed to when it was quite young.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
Far too much. I rarely do much else on the internet, except look for pr0n!!! It takes up about 90% of my free time, with actually making games probably takes up 1%.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS?
Not really. Unless you count Gorthor or Dickboy.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yeah but no but yeah, like when I was younger I was like trying to make my own adventure games, but no It was too hard, but yeah then I found AGS and then CJ sold his baby to chantelle for a westlife cd.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
No, it is far too hard for a graphically minded person.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
I'd like to.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
There was, but not so much anymore.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Nope.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Yes, it's free and the community are not a bunch of nerds who salivate when a women joins. We are a welcoming lot, and gender counts for nothing. As long as you are insightful and have a passion, we welcome all.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Women write female dialog better, due to the fact that us stupid males don't know what the hell a woman would say.

11. Any other comments?
I still can't find my pants... AND PALY ACE QUEST11!11!1!1
I am Jean-Pierre.

Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #48 on: 21 Apr 2006, 15:33 »
Name: Richard Harpe (AKA: rharpe)

Age: 30

Female/male: Male

Quote from: kristofski
1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
Since 2002 or 2003... maybe even before. (Not sure really.)

Quote from: kristofski
2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
I love the old school Sierra Online and Lucas Arts Games made back in the late 80's and early 90's.

Quote from: kristofski
3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I find it amazing that CJ didn't decide to go commercial with all the publicity he has recieved from the site and the AGS software. And I feel there is a greater respect for him amongst the users/followers.

Quote from: kristofski
4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
Fairly big actually. I visit the site at least 2 to 3 times a day...if not, more. It helps me practice my artwork, take criticism, build friendships with people that love the same thing I love...Game Design!

Quote from: kristofski
5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
I'm still trying to find time. Being 30 and all with a family and other "real life" responsibilities... time is the hardest thing come up with. Where was AGS 15 years ago???

Quote from: kristofski
6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
I actually was learning some other game development software: Multimedia Fusion 1.5. (And in the past have dabbled with other programming languages.)

Quote from: kristofski
b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?
Sure. But AGS was the best for "Adventure Games".

Quote from: kristofski
c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the experience differ?
The ony other game development software I use is Multimedia Fusion 1.5. It's different from AGS because it was not specifically designed to make "Adventure Games." But it is great for making any other types of games!

Quote from: kristofski
d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
No. But it has inspired me to work on dreams I've had since I was a kid. To make my own games, the way I like them.

Quote from: kristofski
7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
The PC game industry is dominated by males... no questioned asked. But the ratio of game designs between male and females are probably even. Why because you could have 100 males and only 25 of them making games... And 25 females and 6 are making games.

Quote from: kristofski
8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Nope. Male or female, if it's good, I could care less.

Quote from: kristofski
9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
I can't see how it's any easier for females than males? Ags makes it easy for anyone to make a game regardless of a persons sex, race, or age.

Quote from: kristofski
10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Maybe some slight differences. Males tend to put more "male eye candy" in their designs. This could also reflect the maturity of that person. But like I said before, the line is quite blurry.


Quote from: kristofski
11. Any other comments?
AGS is the best "Adventure Game Design" software out there. It's intuitive, powerful, and gives instant results. My hat goes off to Chris Jones for making such an exceptional piece of game-design innovation!
"Hail to the king, baby!"

Stefan Z

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Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #49 on: 22 Apr 2006, 16:16 »
Well, if I have to..... I don't have to? Well, I'll do it anyway.

Name: Stefan Z. (real name: Christiaan Timmer)

Age: 24

Female/male: Male.

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I downloaded the program in 2004, but didn't get around to use it until november 2005.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
I stumbled across NORM one day, and after playing some of those games I followed the trail to adventuregamestudio.co.uk. When there is such an easy-to-use program to make my own adventure games, why not give it a try?

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
It created a very dynamic communicaty; it's very easy to just 'jump in'. The mood is very relaxed I think, because people don't have to earn their living with it. Of course the downside is that people might not have enough motivation, but any freeware engine that's behind games like Ben Jordan or a concept like NORM easily overcomes these negative points. But being kind of a newbie, I might be wrong ;-)

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
It's a hobby. I check the boards 5, 6 times a week. I like to follow the discussions and occasionally add my own thoughts and opinions.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want.
Yes! I just finished my first game: Snake. So that's one.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
I have programmed some small applications in Pascal / Delphi. But that was a long time ago. As said before, stumbling across AGS unleashed a formerly unknown part of my brain. After downloading AGS, I briefly tried out some programs to make text-adventures, but because I never played text-adventure, I found it boring to make one.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

Probably not. But most things find their way.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
I did use some programs to make text-adventures. I can recommend HUGO. But I can't really comment on this.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
Ha! No, it's only a hobby.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
There do seem to be more men than women, being a newbie I don't know if there is a 'divide'. I did find it strange to read that DragonRose got reactions from people being 'shocked that's she's a girl'.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
I have a slight preference towards games made by women, since they generally, I'm speaking in general here, tend to have more emphasis on characters instead of plot (I'm thinking of Gabriel Knight).

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Seeing that most schools offering computer courses still have 90%+ male students, I think any program that makes programming a game easier will make it easier for females to make games. But I'm on the brink of being a sexist here, so I'll shut up.

[/b]10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?[/b]
Can't think of anything. When a game kicks ass, it kicks ass, right?

11. Any other comments?
AGS forever!

Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #50 on: 22 Apr 2006, 20:18 »
Name: Kristjan Ostov

Age:13

Female/male:male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
Started to play and watch formus since 2003 joined this year

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
My classmate wa doing games with game maker and he was quite good at it and i wanted to make games too but i didnt choose GM becaus then he would have callen me a n00b so i searched foe game making programs and found AGS

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
Well if it wasn't a freeware programm there wouldn't be so big and friendly community

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
Pretty big part because i go to school and i have lots of free time every day so I check/post/read forums 10-15 times a day

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Not yet but will realese a game soon...

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:
Umm i realy haven't completed anything yet but I'll answer anyway

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yes
b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
I have used Game Maker you can create almost anything with it

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
Hmmm...I guess not but maybe

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
There is more men than women...

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
No a game is a game it doesn't realy matter who made it (as long it's a good game!)

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Don't know realy...

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
No like I sed a game is a game

11. Any other comments?
Everybody have a nice day!
- They are all from AGS coloringball

skw

  • stuck in the 90s
    • I can help with backgrounds
    •  
    • I can help with play testing
    •  
    • I can help with translating
    •  
    • I can help with web design
    •  
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #51 on: 23 Apr 2006, 01:00 »
Name: Jan Teodor Czyżewski / John Theodore Tchyzevsky | Age: 18 | Male


1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?

          One year (since April 2005).

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

          I always wanted to make an old school adventure game. The AGS engine seemed the best of all available of that kind.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

          I think it's obvious. The less you have to pay, the more people will be able to pay. AGS enables everyone to test it before and make a game of full value without any payments. This also helps people to improve their artistic and programming skills.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

          It depends. Currently I visit the forums a few times a day. I'm also trying to make a game and improve my digital painting and scripting skills at once.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want

          N/A

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

          a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

                    Yes.

          b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

                    N/A

          c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

                    A few. AFAIR, it was in 1999 and they were simple text-based adventures with lo-res static backgrounds.

          d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

                    Well, maybe. I'm trying to take the graphic studies and then obtain a bachelor title.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

          Yes, there's much more males than females. But who cares?

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

          Yes. But it's not a negative feeling.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

          Ask female.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

          It's just as with, for example, books. Yes, it's a difference, maybe because women are more sensitive.

11. Any other comments?

          Thanks. I hope my entry will be at least a bit useful.
« Last Edit: 23 Apr 2006, 01:06 by Skurwy »
a.k.a. johnnyspade

Etcher Squared Games

  • What should I call this thing?
    • I can help with AGS tutoring
    •  
    • I can help with play testing
    •  
    • I can help with scripting
    •  
    • I can help with story design
    •  
    • I can help with voice acting
    •  
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #52 on: 23 Apr 2006, 01:01 »
Name:real - Bryan, on here - Worm III, originally on here  EtcherSquaredGames

Age:
28 (29 in 1 week)

Female/male:
male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
July 2004 is when I made my first training game

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
Well, the whole adventure game genre was dead to me.  Lucas arts and Sierra no longer made these sorts of games and companies like "the adventure company" or who ever they are called made really horrible games.  I sought out a place pretty much like this.  I found the AGS site first and then later on found the other one whose name eludes me at the moment (the one with the more complicated scripting).  I found the games were better than the "professional" ones today.  

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
Free is always good.  If people had to pay, that always keeps people away.  But if it were cheap (like $5) then it might be ok, but I prefer that CJ keep it free *wink wink*.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
It terms of a hobby, it's a big part.  Personally I've fallen into the pattern of 1 game a year, but I lurk on the boards and read a lot, but don't post that often myself (trying to get back in which is why I'm doing this survey).  I tell a lot of people about how I make freeware games and it's amazing how I get these big bright eyes and like "Oh really wow, what have you made?"  But they never have heard of any (either) of my games so far.  But it's still a great conversation piece.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Free publicity is always good.  "Sierra Quest 1: Roberta in Love" and "Into the Light" are the two official games I've made.  I'll be announcing "Scene 1 Take 1" once Zyn gets me artwork (hint hint zyn...j/k no hurry).  I also got paid to create a tutorial about AGS for a place called "Cyber Camps".  I created a short stupid little game called "Stickman" (because I actually can't draw...) and wrote up a tutorial geared for 8-12 year olds on making their own game.  The people were actually impressed with what I created.  

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
All my life.  I played my parent's "Pong" game when I first saw it, went to Atari 2600, then Nintendo, then Super Nintendo, etc etc.  And have always wanted to create my own all my life.  I've wanted to work for Nintendo and back in the day, Sierra.  Unfortunatly, Sierra doesn't really do this anymore, but oh well.  This keeps me happy.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?



c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
...just AGS

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
Again, always a dream, but I definatly don't have the background to ever do it professionally.


7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
Seems like it is mostly guys yes, but the woman sure hold their own.  My good friend, Kinoko (creator of "Cirque de Zale" (I hope I spelled that right)), could beat me any day on graphics, story, and design.  

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
The only thing is it would be cool just seeing how a woman thinks through her game.  How they approach things versus a guy.  Otherwise, doesn't make a difference.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Yeah sure, for one, any girl could pretend to be a guy (Frankenstein) if she feels that she'd not get the respect as a woman.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Not that I have noticed.

11. Any other comments?
One thing on a personal note about the AGS community is how kind they have been to me.  They understand that when "I" do the graphics, that I simply can't draw, and they go easy on me in terms of commenting about that.  Otherwise I get very kind comments and critiques about my games.  I appreciate it very much.
« Last Edit: 01 May 2006, 20:07 by Worm III »
website: http://www.etcher2games.com/
email: etcher2games@yahoo.com
forum: http://www.etcher2games.com/forums

Anyone want to make my website for free?

R4L

  • You need me Rick...
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #53 on: 01 May 2006, 19:15 »
Name: Corey Hectus

Age: 15

Male/Female: Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I found AGS on the summer of 2000. My friend had found RPG Maker and I wondered if there were any more programs like that. I found AGS, which to me was the most flexible and, not to mention, easier program. I joined the forum the day I got it and went off to learn how to use the functions. I was 9 at the time, and most of it was hard to learn, especially the if/else statements for some reason.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
I just wanted to make games. I found out later that AGS is basically used to create adventure games, and most people at the time were re-making King's Quest games. I on the other hand didn't finish any games until I was ready, in 2003. I had spent the whole time learning the script, and nagging people on the forums. Then I figured out the if/else statemjents on my own and I learned to do some different things in AGS.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I think free is best. At the same time I found AGS another program called DarkBASIC was around. It forced people to pay $50.00 american plus shipping and handling, and from what I remember, the forums didn't really have too many people on it. These forums usually have activity almost all the time.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
AGS for me is a hobby, and the only thing I turn to that lets me be creative and do what I like to do. I haven't used it lately, because of school and the lack of game ideas. The AGS community is like a big brother to me. I always post something on the forums I don't understand, and I usually get a nice response that solves my problem. I haven't caused any uproar on the forums, except when I first joined, and from there, the forums have been great.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Yeah, these games weren't really any "ambitious" projects, these were just games I did to see if my practice at the script had paid off, and they did. Well I got the basics down. I have worked on Practice Script: The 1 Room Puzzler, a game I haven't finished called Nightmare, and I have a MAGS game entitled Ray and the Guitar. I kinda moved into the non-adventure category and hope to make a 2D AGS Smash Brothers like game.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yes. Very interested. I got the Xbox around 2001 and I then I said "How do they do that?" This thought has always led me to AGS and other freeware programs. I would initially take a game design like boxing and see how it would work in AGS, of course the lack of C++ knowledge always keeps me away from that one.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?
To tell you the truth, no. I originally had wanted to be a Graphic Designer, but now, I want to go to college for Game Design or Visual Art.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
I tried DarkBASIC, but the lack of interface always gets me. I use AGS because of its simplexity. The thing is though, I actually know AGS compared to other programs like BlitzBasic or darkBASIC. It's just that I have fun making a game with AGS, and when I use a program I don't recognize, I get frustrated and usually stop doing what I was doing.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
AGS has always inspired me, but at the moment, im having a real hard time thinking about what to do in the future. I want to go to college for Game Design, and hope to work with Lionhead Studios and produce the amazing games that Peter Molyneux creates. But on the other hand, I want to go to college for visual arts so I can draw better and hopefully come back to AGS and create better quality games.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
There are more guys here yes, but other than that, there are women on the forums. So no, I don't think theres a big gender divide.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Not at all. I have been anticipating Kinoko's Gift of Aldora for quite some time now. At first, I didn't know if Kinoko was a girl or guy, then I read some of her posts, and then it was quite clear. Lol, you are funny Rebecca.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Not really sure how to answer this one.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Not that I have noticed.

11. Any other comments?
If I could change one thing about the forums, it would be this. When you first register, you would be taken to the forum rules page, a page that shows the rules for every topic. After that, you would take a test about these topics and you would have to get them all right. I have been seeing lately that some people just post where ever they want (yodaman). And some people just don't care about the quality of their games (yodaman). They just draw some
really quick sprites, and put them into a really quickly drawn room, and make a really fast game with about 4-5 bugs, and expect people to applaude them for their "hard" work. Note to n00bs- A room alone may take weeks to months to make, depending on your experience and a sprite may take days to weeks to create. And ripped sprites don't count for original artwork. :p

Ghost

  • Guest
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #54 on: 03 May 2006, 12:11 »
Name:
Björn "GHOST" Ludwig

Age:
31

Female/male:
male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I registered 2002, 2003, got abroad for a while and then
I came back to stay.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
I always loved adventure games; I saw quite a lot of the
"golden classics" actually being top-notch, brand new, shiny showcase displays. When I saw a
report about AGS on  german tv show Giga Games, I thought I might give it a try- it was then when I first saw
an almost perfect program.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I am pretty sure people like to test a free program more than one they have to pay in advance, but that only helps to build a comminity in the first place. People stay because of the quality, I think. One april's fools day joke has shown that quite a lot of people here would actually pay for AGS.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
Apart from keeping my caffeine level on an actually SURVIVABLE amount? Well, I check the forums, three or four times a week, but that's about it.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
Nothing to present here; I'm working on two games, though.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?


7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
Haven't noticed one so far.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Women are the better storytellers. That's really true, in both professional and hobby games. Can't put my finger on it, but they have a knack to put in small details into a
story, so yes, if I know a game was made by a male or female designer, I automatically adjust some expectations.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
I'd say AGS is a good start for people who are not experienced in programming. Male or female doesn't matter.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
I really wouldn't know anything else but the things I stated in question 8.

11. Any other comments?
Witches always stand between birch trees.

cpage

  • Laziest member
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #55 on: 07 May 2006, 02:53 »
Name: Chris Page | Age: 21 | Male


1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?

          Registered this user name on ezboard on August 12, 2001, Lurked for about a year before posting under the name cjpthatsme.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

          Wanted to make a game, and I really needed a hobby as it was before I could drive so I had NOTHING to do.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

          Well it seems that every year there are more and more people. If they had to pay for it they would probably go with another system that is free. I think even with all the great features it has AGS had it been sold would never had grown to the wonderful community it is today.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

         It used to play alot more of one, then over time we seperated but I'm getting back into it now.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want

          A couple but nothing too notable.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

          a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

                    Yes.

          b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

                    Yes..... I dont mean to sound like an ass but I had already used GF and KnP

          c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

                   I find it less enjoyable to be honest, Probably because if you need help you know you will wind up asking a bunch of cocky jerks where as here it is people over time you know and like to talk to.

          d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

                    Maybe..... I do like to do it but I think graphic design is more my thing.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

          not really no

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

          not really no

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

          I think it is every bit as easy for both genders. I really dont think they need to find a way to get into it any more then men.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

          To be honest.... Yes and No there are always exceptions but in my experience the story lines by women seem to have more....... Dimention

11. Any other comments?

          San Dimas High School Football Rules!

Sinister

  • I AM THE ALPHA AND THE OMEGA!
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #56 on: 12 May 2006, 05:39 »
Name: Sinister - Real: AJ Alegria

Age:23

Female/male:Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
-Around for 4 years now..

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?

-I've always wanted to make my own Adventure games, since i was 15 years old.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?

-AGS has opened up a lot of space for new indy developers, and given people who want to become professional game developers or who want to work in the industry a glimpse of what game making is about.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?

-AGS has claimed much of my free time, and has led me to meet people from all over the globe, and form part of one of the best teams around. I would trade AGS for anything right now.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want

-Yes. I've had my first failures (i say failure cause i never finished them) and others that im very proud of.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

- Very much so, when I was 15 I was inspired by LSL to make a comode adventure game based on my own life as a teen in a school with lots of parties and girls!.. That led to later ideas, led me to found a website and tale part of greater projects later on.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?

- Yes, and no.. other programs do have a downside always, while some are easier to use  yet provide no real authoring safety, others provide a lot of security but are quite complex. Some provide a nice leap into other genres but serve no other purpose.. 

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?

-Yes, but its just a dream... perhaps one day..

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?

- Not, really.. but males are more common.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?

- Well, not really.. if the game is good, i dont care if its a woman or a guy who did it. However it's always fun to see what a woman is comming up with. After all, one woman (R.Williams) created the genre as we knew it, and others brought to a new level.. so seeing some women trying to reach that is very interesting.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?

- Not, really AGS is a non gender oriented so i say it helps both men and women dive into computer game design.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?

-To go out and say.. NO, is perhaps being a bit naive. The styles of Roberta Williams, Jane Jensen, Al Lowe have each their own contrast, im not sure weather gender has anything to do with it, or if its just personality.. but who cares if we do percieve a diference.. men and women are diferent like, any man is diferent from another!.. So cheers to diversity.

11. Any other comments?

- For those, who know me.. i came off rather composed didnt I?.. ;D So.. now.. BEER!! BOOZE! SEX AND ROCK AND ROLL! DUDE!

Dan_N

  • Wasting time since '91.
    • I can help with play testing
    •  
    • I can help with scripting
    •  
    • I can help with story design
    •  
    • I can help with translating
    •  
    • I can help with voice acting
    •  
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #57 on: 02 Aug 2006, 11:05 »
Hey, what the heck?
I'm not doing anything good anyway.

Name: Dan N. (real name not giving - paranoia!).

Age: 15.

Female/male: male, last time I checked (this morning).

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community? RE: 2 months.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS? RE: I'm on the search for great game creators with easy-to-learn interfaces so of course I got this one! (I also was impressed with Yahtzee's 5 Days a Skeptic)

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it? RE: It's bigger! Because more people have acces to it.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life? RE: It's something to do.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want. RE: Not with anyone else, I'm just working on two games - In Space (just for fun) and Circus Minimus (for MAGS august 2006).

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS? RE: Yes game design and programmin (Pascal).

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS? RE: -

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the experience differ? RE: well, it's done much slower, I mean with borland's pascal editor I have to write letter by letter the code for the game (graphics, sound, scripts) and it takes me about two weeks to make even a quarter of a game, while in AGS it took me two days to finish about two rooms. You draw a parallel.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally? RE: It's been my dream to become a game designer, I mean, kids in my class wanted to be astronauts, doctors, nuclear physists ;), but I wanted to be a game designer. I don't know, maybe when I'm older I'll get a break and design games for the new, reformed Westwood or for Blizzard (ah, dreams, dreams).

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community? RE: well, in the community, I don't know, I haven't seen such a thing, but in game making, of course women (mostly) will have their main character be female and men (mostly) will have their main charcter be male. This is to put them in the skin of the character.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way? RE: no. It's still fun!

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way? RE: Well, studies show that men are more likely to go into computer programming and technical stuff as they find it much to complicated (I'm not saying anything!!!), I guess, so, I guess again, that now that AGS is much simpler, maybe this will attract a much larger female community. Right?

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females? RE: except from the main character (usually), no. But I haven't seen any horror games made by females yet (maybe you could point me to one?).

11. Any other comments? RE: nope.

Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #58 on: 17 Dec 2006, 11:50 »
Name: Sakari

Age: Born 6th of December 1989, so 17 at the moment.

Female/male: Male

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
-Hmm... I've been poking around the forums for a year now, I think. I havent posted much though.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
-I really wanted to make my own adventure game, and I really didn't want to learn to program.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
-I think more people are attracted to freeware than commercial products, and of course the author
gets more respect from the community, because he has given his product to communitys use for free.

4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
-Well since I have no other life than sitting on the computer, it's important for me that I can create something in some way.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
-The Big Bad Wolf and the Three little pigs is my first game, and I made it completely by myself.

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:


a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?

-I've always been interested in making adventure games. I've also tried creating levels for FPS games, but it never worked out for me.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?
-Well I can still answer this: I think that I would have left to whole idea of creating my own
adventure game, if I never had found AGS.

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the experience differ?
-Nope.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
-Well sometimes the idea spins around my mind, but I really try to come up with a job that is related to movie making. So the answer is: a bit.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
- Well I have only seen a couple of females here, so I really can't say anything to this one.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
-Yes. I think it brings a whole different feel to any game.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
-Yes. Anyone, even females can make an AGS game, but I don't think it really opens any pathway to professional game designing for either males or females.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
- Yes, I think that females put more thought on the story than males in general.

11. Any other comments?
-Nope.
« Last Edit: 17 Dec 2006, 11:53 by Rastis »

FamousAdventurer77

  • Rachel's too lazy to animate it.
    • I can help with play testing
    •  
    • I can help with proof reading
    •  
    • I can help with story design
    •  
    • I can help with translating
    •  
    • I can help with voice acting
    •  
Re: AGS Questionaire!
« Reply #59 on: 17 Dec 2006, 19:28 »
Name: FamousAdventurer77 / Afraid I can't reveal my true name on here.

Age: 21

Female/male: F.

1. How long have you been involved in the AGS community?
I first found out about AGS in 2004 but didn't really get involved with it until mid-2005.

2. Why did you get involved in AGS?
Like my culture that's dedicated to preserving old school ways of life, I was thrilled to find out there was another group of people who felt the same way about my childhood treasure: adventure games. I realized there were a couple thousand people who felt the same way I did about these games, and well, I needed a place to go where I could hold intelligent conversations with people and who could understand the computer geek side of me that my punk and hardcore compatriots sorta can't.

3. How do you feel that the fact that AGS is a freeware programme affect the community that has built up around it?
I think it ensures that only serious adventure game aficionados get involved. Granted, there's terms and conditions if you would like to use AGS to make a profit and since games take so long to make and there's nothing wrong with wanting to get profits for totally busting your ass (especially if you have to work alone). But seriously though, adventure games are hardly even much of a niche market anymore. It's all this 3D kill-everything crap, and game designers are more about revolutionizing hardware (digital eyelash rendering) than about making great software anymore. But the fact that this particular engine is nonprofit also keeps everyone together: only those who really like doing this and making these games will want to get involved. It's not like way back in the day when putting SCI and AGI on your resume would've meant something, if you want to get a job in the gaming industry today it sure won't be with adventure games and definitely wouldn't involve 14+ years old languages that only us real old-schoolers care about.


4. How big a part does the AGS community play in your life?
Thanks to the community, I got one of hell of a research project done for uni. Usually my other life in the music scene is my dominant one but since a few NYC clubs shut down, eh, things have been rather shut-in lately. When I'm not in school [uni makes me want to rip my brain out with a rusty fondue fork] or out with my friends then I'm attempting to finally get my game done. And a lot of people have been real helpful and supportive with my ideas and attempting to help me learn the actual programming language.

5. Have you been involved in making any games using AGS? You may list them if you want
No. But I'm going to plug my own game in progress right now! :D

6. Answer these questions if you have been involved in making AGS games:

a. Were you interested in game design/programming before you started using AGS?
Yes. I attempted making an RPG with Coldstone til I realized it just wasn't going anywhere. It felt like I had a house made of stick figures: it looked great and finished from the front but no internal scripting, um, the whole thing's just a decoration that's going to fall over. I also used to concentrate in Comp Sci in high school where I mastered rudimentary VB98 which is an accomplishment considering that I'm awful at math. But when C++ came around the math was too hard, same when I registered to major in Comp Sci at uni-- I realized that not only was the industry not to my liking but that I'd be better off with just-for-kicks game design like AGS because the gamers I met in my first programming class-- NOT in my sphere at all! I realized that just like with my music/culture, I was born too late. I realized my true purpose a month later.

b. If no, do you feel that you would have got into game design without AGS?
AGS kept me interested if that's what you mean. Luckily my school just started offering a class in basic programming for non-math majors-- meaning maybe I'll finally get the hang of it. :)

c. Do you make games using other programmes, either freeware or not? How does the eperience differ?
I tried Coldstone (if you ever played the adventure-RPG Pillars Of Garendall, this was the engine used for it) to make a parody RPG but realized that unless I had a team of like 150 people to help with things I would never get it done.

d. Has AGS inspired you to try and take up game design professionally?
Quite the opposite actually. I saw the AGS community as another underground network just like my culture: the bands and songs that are a big deal to us, make no difference to normal people who don't know our kind of music and the way bands make themselves known. Our bands tour when we can and live for it but we hold regular jobs and/or go to school in the daytime and when we're not touring. We don't belong to talent agencies or management groups, to quote the Wretched Ones "We don't belong to nobody."

So AGS made me feel the same: "Finally. I can be with other old-schoolers but still keep up my regular job and just do this on the side." Being that the industry changed so much, well, I didn't want to just belong to some company just to be told my ideas were 15 years behind. I didn't want to bother learning the new languages for this unoriginal 3D mass-produced crap...doing AGS for free is fine with me as another hobby of mine that doesn't have anything to do with music and my culture.

7. Do you feel that there is a gender divide in the AGS community?
Women are definitely in the minority. The divide isn't palpable like how it can be in the underground punk and hardcore scene (which I still find sad sometimes) and other scenes and creeds, but computer gaming is still and always was pretty much male-dominated.

8. Are you likely to feel differently about a game if you discover it’s made by a female? In what way?
Being a female player and designer, I have to admit I feel the same pride I feel whenever I see another band that features talented girls: We prove that we can be just as good if not better than men at the same things. Female programmers are a definite minority and we always feel proud of it because it's something that we're told we can't do. I just suck at math so that's why I have a hard time getting the grip of certain languages, but so do a lot of men. Being good or bad at math or programming isn't gender-specific-- fingers get pointed at women a lot for not being good a math but I think that the men who are bad at math just don't get spotlighted enough.

And let me tell you it's the same with music. I play guitar a hell whole lot better than a lot of boys I know but men who suck at guitar don't get pinpointed as much as women who do, just because some are still intimidated at the ideas of women getting into male-dominated fields. F.ck I'm proud of being involved in three heavily male-dominant fields and proving people wrong all the time! But to get back to the point,

Great game design and crappy game design are not gender specific. I saw some good points throughout the thread, one man mentioned that men are more likely to draw romanticized versions of women, ie with bigger breasts and nice bodies or just in the way they are vocalized or portrayed; whereas a female game designer may give a more realistic portrayal. I think it all depends on the individual designer and how they want to tell the story and portray the characters. Girls sometimes make romanticized versions of themselves too because it's expected, or what they could wish they could look like, etc.
But once again it all depends on a lot of things of how they want the art to properly execute the story and game design itself.

9. Do you feel that AGS makes it easier for females to get involved in computer game design? In what way?
Yes and no. Some girls can get turned off from it the same way men can; when scripting and that Global Settings Module look really intimidating. I know it did with me at first! (Hence why I'm putting off scripting for as loooong as possible.)

Pretty much, it's sexually ambiguous: the same thing can happen with men. Getting exposed to a great AGS game and realizing you can make your own; well, it's ambiguous.

10. Do you feel that there is a difference between the types of games created by males and females?
Hand in hand with #8 bigtime: I've agreed and disagreed with responses I've seen from people throughout the thread:

Girls can write and design about different things as much as men can. The sky's the limit! But one comment that stuck out was when someone had said that women who designed the games get more attention-- I can explain this phenomenon. It's just like how it was when a certain hardcore band I briefly joined in '04 had this big uproar from other people, like "Huh? They let a girl in?!" Some people are really subconsciously affected at how this society teaches us to think: that in spite of all the things women can do, some things will still shock people (namely men) because of the invasion of such a male-dominated field. Like they think we're still not "allowed" to do it and it's unspoken. And in the case of music and other things, and game design has to do with it too-- there's just things that they think seem more "appropriate" for girls, like I hate pop punk and faux hardcore and that crap but it's just what some of these a-holes deem "appropriate" or appealing to girls. Whereas I and a lot of other women who feel the same way just want the REAL THING straight up, no bulls..t. (If you know the bands: ie, I would sooner cover Warzone or Blitz* than Blondie or something.) So in the gaming world, a romantic fantasy type game would be considered "appropriate" for girls, or at least more appealing.

I've played funny games on here, fantasy-themed, serious ones, violent ones, all types. Designed by both men and women, and production teams. They all appeal to me because they're old school! But if it's shocking you want, read on:

But I know that when and if I ever finish my game it would get attention called to it for being designed by a woman, because it's a theme that women are usually too afraid to explore: I'm making a game called "On The Prowl" loosely based on Leisure Suit Larry 1. You HARDLY EVER hear of a game where it's a girl on the chase instead of a guy and typically when such games or films are made, they're written by men and are usually a portrayal of male fantasy rather than the actions a woman would really take IRL if she was going to go out and paint the town red; and also the fantasy and sexually ambiguous viewpoints from a woman (portrayed wrongly in all mediums 95% of the time). I'm a libertine and have nothing but pride in making this and hope it encourages both men and women alike to have the same open attitude. But yes, this indeed is not a game a girl would typically make.

Most people would say that girls try not to be violent: look at Cirque du Zale, that game kicked ass and was designed by a woman and did feature some violence and attitudes that would not be deemed "ladylike" (You go girl :)) But men also make non-violent games (Bog's Adventures featured minimal blood and violence.)

My final say on the matter? Gender's an illusion. Controversy rocks. Women can be very male and men can be very female and sometimes game design will reflect that. Both genders should tear down the walls society puts up, of what they "should" make and what's expected of them. I hope that's the effect my finished game will have on people, that it'll inspire them to do something different and controversial.

11. Any other comments?
I'll probably graduate from uni by the time my game's finished. But it'll be totally worth it when you're playing as Lara Corley who's trying to make her night be something other than "The Day I Got Fired and Dumped In A One-Hour Period" and will she sleep with Indiana Jones? Only one way to find out! (And that's to wait til my game's finished and play the whole thing through. Those Indy cutscenes I'm working on are my pride and death.)

*- ever play "Razors in the Night"? Punks will get the joke here.
If you want to know the Bible's contents, just watch Lord of the Rings or listen to the last 8 Blind Guardian albums. It's pretty much the same thing.