Author Topic: Some of my brief articles on enigmatic (and great) authors. Feedback welcome!!!  (Read 209 times)

KyriakosCH

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« Last Edit: 09 Aug 2018, 13:54 by KyriakosCH »
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I read the article about Kafka (because I read "Die Verwandlung" a few months ago).

An interesting thought, what has happened before the book starts. The interpretation I thought of after reading the story was, that Gregor suffered from burn-out syndrome and depression. Just think about the pressure his family and work put on him. Now that he got sick, he can't work anymore and is useless like a giant bug to everyone, like one that you usually squash with your foot. So the metamorphosis is basically just a symptom of it, similar to as you described in the last paragraph.

More directly related to your article/writing: I found the paragraph after "Does Gregor know what happened to him?" hard to understand, I'm not sure what you wanted to say there.

KyriakosCH

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I read the article about Kafka (because I read "Die Verwandlung" a few months ago).

An interesting thought, what has happened before the book starts. The interpretation I thought of after reading the story was, that Gregor suffered from burn-out syndrome and depression. Just think about the pressure his family and work put on him. Now that he got sick, he can't work anymore and is useless like a giant bug to everyone, like one that you usually squash with your foot. So the metamorphosis is basically just a symptom of it, similar to as you described in the last paragraph.

More directly related to your article/writing: I found the paragraph after "Does Gregor know what happened to him?" hard to understand, I'm not sure what you wanted to say there.

Thanks ^_^

Re your question, in that part of the article i am presenting how Gregor's lack of will to look back has a very clear parallel to Kafka's own fear of examining his own sources of troubles (particularly because he regards those sources as extremely complicated and capable of causing him feelings of horror). This information is found all over his diary notes and letters :)
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I understood the later part of the article very well, I'm talking about this part, that is confusing to me:

Quote
Let us be reminded of the aforementioned ability Kafka had to present stories that burst with life – not in regards to their sentiments; they are almost never jovial, but in regards to the believable struggle of the characters to move about, or at least crawl about, in the world they are found in. With that in mind, it can seem quite logical to examine whether Kafka had fleshed out – in his own imagination; he didn’t provide such information in the story – the answer to this question.
There are a bit too many - and ; for my taste. Your thoughts are fragmented and hard to follow. It is clear that you did some thorough research on Kafka and thought about his work a lot, but you should give readers a chance to catch up ;)

KyriakosCH

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I understood the later part of the article very well, I'm talking about this part, that is confusing to me:

Quote
Let us be reminded of the aforementioned ability Kafka had to present stories that burst with life – not in regards to their sentiments; they are almost never jovial, but in regards to the believable struggle of the characters to move about, or at least crawl about, in the world they are found in. With that in mind, it can seem quite logical to examine whether Kafka had fleshed out – in his own imagination; he didn’t provide such information in the story – the answer to this question.
There are a bit too many - and ; for my taste. Your thoughts are fragmented and hard to follow. It is clear that you did some thorough research on Kafka and thought about his work a lot, but you should give readers a chance to catch up ;)

Oh :D

Yes, i mean (written in a Henry James style, maybe :D ) that Kafka apparently lived (in his mind) the things he presented, so it is highly likely he had thought of the past of Gregor, and had an answer as to what happened to him and why, despite not presenting any of it in the story :)

By the way, i added a new article, on my favourite story by Kafka! The Burrow... I had actually translated this to Greek, for a book which was published last year. I love that story!
On Kafka's The Burrow: https://hubpages.com/literature/Inside-Kafkas-Burrow
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KyriakosCH

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Added a new article, on the devastating short story "Flowers for Algernon", by Daniel Keyes: https://hubpages.com/literature/Flowers-For-Algernon-The-Story-of-Charlie-Gordon :)
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KyriakosCH

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If you like Lovecraft, and loners... this is an article about Lovecraft and his loners :=

To be more exact, it is about the human-monster hybrids who are pushed away from the world, and into the darkness and isolation :=
https://hubpages.com/literature/Why-HP-Lovecrafts-Work-is-so-Appealing-to-the-Outsider
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