Jibble

Author Topic: Exciting exotic animals  (Read 1340 times)

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #20 on: 24 Mar 2020, 17:20 »
This thread is delightful.
Yeah, I thought this forum could use more threads to cheer people up what with all that's going on in the world,
plus there's just so many animals that's just too weird not to share pics and videos on.

Like the Tarsier, the Furby's evil cousin:

Gilbert

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Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #21 on: 25 Mar 2020, 05:33 »
Did anyone else know there were turtles with soft shells?
These "turtles" are considered a delicacy with high nutrition value and are relatively expensive.
About 20 years ago, I went with my superior to the mainland to meet some writers of supporting materials (I am a mathematics textbook editor if you don't know already). At lunch they ordered a soup with such creature. It's the whole thing chopped into pieces with recognisable limbs (together with claws), head, and the shell still attached, etc...

...and they never ate it, but told me to eat more: "this is great and good to you!" I had no choice but to had some...

Now I have told you this.

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #22 on: 25 Mar 2020, 10:39 »
I always thought anglerfish were pretty metal:



OK in searching for that image I can across this gem:

"...if the deep-sea anglerfish happened to have the cognitive and physical capabilities required to produce its own such films, there’d be decidedly fewer plot twists. Every single movie would go a little something like this: Boy meets girl, boy bites girl, boy’s mouth fuses to girl’s body, boy lives the rest of his life attached to girl sharing her blood and supplying her with sperm. Ah, a tale as old as time."  :-\

Source: https://www.wired.com/2013/11/absurd-creature-of-the-week-anglerfish/

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #23 on: 26 Mar 2020, 01:15 »
Those fish always struck me as faintly terrifying. Fascinating specimen, that. I wonder if it is edible; might have gone well with that pancake turtle stew mentioned above.

Now, today's addition: a taxidermical novelty.

Blue whales are extraordinary creatures. They are the largest known creature to have swimmed the Earth. They eat krill, of course. On the brink of extinction, I fear, although their situation is improving. Lovely beings.

Here is a prepared and preserved specimen that they keep in the natural history museum in my city (partially built to accommodate it). It is called the Malmian Whale, after its taxidermist. It is quite big.

Spoiler: ShowHide


Bear in mind that this specimen is practically in his boyhood: a full-grown blue whale would be about twice as large!

He stranded on the coast on a late autumn day in 1865. The poor creature was quite ineptly killed by local fishermen, after which August Malm arrived from the city museum to examine it. It proved to be a remarkable specimen, and it was later butchered and preserved for the museum, and a little tea-room was built inside. Imagine if it had been fully grown; they could have fitted a whole restaurant, no doubt.

Since the mouth is hinged and can be opened, Mr Malm have a long and varied career, for a cetacean. He has been a travelling exhibit to Hamburg and Berlin, a museum café, a polling station and, undoubtedly, host for many kissing couples. He also did his part in the Winter War, during a donation drive, which I find rather sweet; 'A People is in Peril. YOU can help. See the whale for details.' He still opens shop for Christmas, and on the national election day.
He is still a popular visit for school children, and I still find it rather thrilling to see the whale. It is magnificent to think of these titanic creatures.

Here is a picture of a skull from an adult specimen:

Spoiler: ShowHide


Compare it to the size of the skull in the previous picture. 'You're gonna need a bigger museum.'

As a parting reflexion on the subject of whales: their blow-holes are, apparently, their nostrils. It is very peculiar.

Gilbert

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Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #24 on: 26 Mar 2020, 01:33 »
I wonder if it is edible; might have gone well with that pancake turtle stew mentioned above.
Yes. Or at least some subclasses(? subtypes?, subspecies? I'm not good at this), especially in Japan. They brew soup with these fish for noodles/udon.
There used to be a Japanese restaurant nearby which specialised in udon in angler fish soup (though we usually order udon in tomato soup more often).

...

Why am I only posting comments on whether some monsters weird animals are edible here?!!

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #25 on: 08 Apr 2020, 09:46 »
I'm not sure what it says bout me that I can see a video about a Mexican lizard
that looks like a worm with tiny front legs and the only thing that surprise me
is the fact that a creature that weird isn't extinct, it's not even endangered.

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #26 on: 16 May 2020, 10:50 »

Mata mata is a small forest creature that is too fat to hunt or forage and arms sticking from under it’s chin are too short to pick anything. It’s only evolutionary advantage is the adorable smile, irresistible to the many occupants of the forest who feed it and predators that take pity on it.
How does mata mata reproduce? Well, it doesn’t, its too lazy to mate. But it is also too lazy to die, so it just grows old forever.




This is a factual report from the Amazon.
How much wood would a wood chuck chuck if a wood chuck could chuck wood?

Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #27 on: 19 May 2020, 15:45 »
I just found out about the Arabian Sand Boa, and it's gotta be the derpiest-looking snake I've ever seen!

KyriakosCH

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Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #28 on: 19 May 2020, 16:22 »
There's the goblin shark.



I like the ant-lion, though. Part insect, part living metaphor for a demon.
It is also quite interesting that it later on morphs into another being, which is tame - some type of fruitfly. Imagine having to get through hunting in the sand-dunes and luring other insects to the bottom of the pit of quick-sand you built to introduce them to your mandibles, only so that in the next stage you are a nerdy fruitfly.

« Last Edit: 19 May 2020, 16:27 by KyriakosCH »
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Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #29 on: 19 May 2020, 22:07 »
I like the ant-lion, though. Part insect, part living metaphor for a demon.
It is also quite interesting that it later on morphs into another being, which is tame - some type of fruitfly. Imagine having to get through hunting in the sand-dunes and luring other insects to the bottom of the pit of quick-sand you built to introduce them to your mandibles, only so that in the next stage you are a nerdy fruitfly.
And the worst part is that said fruitfly often ends up prey to young antlions.

I'm glad being a human means that I'll never have to worry about falling into a crib and getting eaten by the baby!

KyriakosCH

  • Alien spiral maker
    • I can help with backgrounds
    • I can help with story design
    • I can help with translating
Re: Exciting exotic animals
« Reply #30 on: 19 May 2020, 22:41 »
^It's good that in our species the young never replace the old - or at least the old can also use lethal force  (nod)
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