Author Topic: A jab or not a jab....that is the question  (Read 1601 times)

Cassiebsg

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #20 on: 14 Jan 2021, 23:45 »
The more grounds (read people & animals) the more it will mutate. Think I read somewhere that it mutates every 14 days... or was it less? In other words, the more it's "allowed" to run free and multiply, the more chances it has to mutate. So far these mutations seem to just be "more infectious"... just think if it mutates to "more deadly"? or "more infectious & more deadly"?  8-0

We're down to 3 more weeks of lock-down (though not as confined as other countries) until the 7th Feb, because of "the British variant" and even though the number of new infected is dropping... (but they say the number of infect by this new variant is still going up)
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Snarky

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #21 on: 15 Jan 2021, 06:40 »
Sorry, Khris, I couldn't actually find anything on google myself. It was on the BBC dinner time news. I am
pretty sure that's what they said, but if I am proved wrong I apologise.

I'm pretty sure that, as Khris says, what you heard must have been about the report that having had COVID-19 provides (about 85%) immunity for 5 months.

I find it quite amazing that researchers have been able to develop not just one, but a number of apparently effective vaccines — in record time — when we had never before been able to bring to market a vaccine for any coronavirus in humans. (As I understand it, there were only some animal vaccines and some experimental ones.) "A cure for the common cold" (a coronavirus) has been one of those missing medical breakthroughs that people have talked about for decades — there's even an AGS game based on that joke!

Mandle

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #22 on: 15 Jan 2021, 08:18 »
"A cure for the common cold" (a coronavirus)

Or Rhinovirus, or over a hundred other kinds of virus, although Corona virus and Rhinovirus are the main 2 culprits.

I'm no expert, but I suspect that is why we don't have a "cure" or vaccine for the common cold. Its effects are too trivial for most people to make such a regimen of tests and vaccinations for so many viruses, lumped under one heading, worth the effort.

And that it's not so much that a particular "Corona virus" in and of itself offers special challenges in producing a working vaccine.

But I could be totally wrong.
« Last Edit: 15 Jan 2021, 08:43 by Mandle »

KyriakosCH

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #23 on: 15 Jan 2021, 08:53 »
Sorry, Khris, I couldn't actually find anything on google myself. It was on the BBC dinner time news. I am
pretty sure that's what they said, but if I am proved wrong I apologise.

I'm pretty sure that, as Khris says, what you heard must have been about the report that having had COVID-19 provides (about 85%) immunity for 5 months.

I find it quite amazing that researchers have been able to develop not just one, but a number of apparently effective vaccines — in record time — when we had never before been able to bring to market a vaccine for any coronavirus in humans. (As I understand it, there were only some animal vaccines and some experimental ones.) "A cure for the common cold" (a coronavirus) has been one of those missing medical breakthroughs that people have talked about for decades — there's even an AGS game based on that joke!

When there is a huge monetary incentive, you'll see many offer products :)
That said, we haven't actually *yet* seen results of those vaccines on the general population.
« Last Edit: 15 Jan 2021, 09:21 by KyriakosCH »
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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #24 on: 15 Jan 2021, 10:55 »
As with all vaccines, despite the rigorous testing, we'll also have to wait and see what the real effect on general populace is. Just yesterday the news here pointed out that Brazilian studies found the Chinese vaccine was 51% effective, far lower than the Chinese research had indicated, and just barely over the 50% required to be approved for use. If the actual effective rates among the population, as well as the time the vaccination is effective, are lower than hoped then herd immunity may be quite a bit of time away.

Still, in my eye this should only encourage more people to take the vaccine, in order to provide better data and understanding to the scientific community beyond that which their own tests can ever hope to achieve.
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BarbWire

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #25 on: 15 Jan 2021, 14:49 »

Hi all
 It would appear that a five month test was undertaken, during which time somebody who had had Covid 19 and built up antibodies
still had protection at the end of this period. A person immunised also had protection until the end of this period. After five months
the effect may lessen but nobody really knows by how much. So, I was kinda right. I can see us all having arms like pin cushion if
we have to have constant injections  :)





Danvzare

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Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #26 on: 15 Jan 2021, 16:15 »
So far these mutations seem to just be "more infectious"... just think if it mutates to "more deadly"? or "more infectious & more deadly"?  8-0
Here's something to think about. If it was equally as infectious, but less deadly, it would appear to be more infectious as more people would walk around without realizing that they have it, and therefore infect more people. And keep in mind that if you come down really bad or even die for that matter, you're less likely to pass it onto someone else as you'll stay in bed. So it stands to reason that mutations that are less deadly, will also be more likely to spread. Meaning as time goes by, a very infectious virus should in theory become increasingly less deadly. Or at the very least, have a longer incubation period.
Also don't forget that your body starts to build up a tolerance to it (or at the very least, those who don't die are already likely to continue to survive).

In other words. There's a reason why the common cold was so deadly to anywhere we brought it to, yet it's now considered harmless everywhere. Not to mention how plagues in the past just kind of... disappeared.

Once again though, please take all of this with a pinch of salt. And if possible, I'd rather be corrected then continue to be wrong.  :-D

Re: A jab or not a jab....that is the question
« Reply #27 on: 15 Jan 2021, 16:24 »
I think that I shall do what comes naturally - keep my tomato tucked in and do as I am told.

It will be a while before there will be a needle for me, but I shall take it when I am asked. Cleverer heads than mine have worked on this, after all. There does not seem to be any narcolepsy in this batch, at least.

I do detest needles, however. I am a baby when it comes to having them. It is terrifying, and I really do not want to have one. But I will have to, of course, so I will try to be a man about it. I suppose I could buy a lollipop on the way, and pretend the doctor gave it to me when I leave. I do hope the damned thing is worth it, but we shall see. EDIT: Apparently, the king and the queen had their dose today. Rather settles the matter; bring them on. I can take needles all day long.

I came out the victor in our first bout (I think), but I am quite aware that the second round may kill me all the same. This virus is a real maverick, it seems to do just about what-ever it please.
« Last Edit: 15 Jan 2021, 16:28 by Reiter »