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Messages - Chicky

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Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: Today at 01:38 »

I believe each game has to be in its own subfolder in a main ags game directory. Eg: AgsGames/indianajones

Cool, that's how I've got it setup. With the app pointing to the main AGS game directory.

Game launcher requires a windows version of game exe, renamed to ac2game.dat to detect a folder.

I found that doing this stopped the app from being able to see the game, I had to do that when I tried the old emulator (Monkey's version) but this time I had to keep it as it's original exe name (with the .exe extension) for the app to be able to see the game.

Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: Today at 01:22 »
I made another build, but it is not final work, just for the test:

I'm able to install this one and the app finds my game folder, however when I run the game I get the error: 'Unable to initialize your audio hardware error', followed by 'Unable to write in the savegame directory.'. The app then crashes.

I've checked permissions on the app and it has write access. I only have 1gb free on my internal storage but I would imagine this is enough?

Can we confirm what the steps are needed for putting the game files onto the phone? I'm using the following process (not sure if I'm doing something wrong):

copy game files (no need for winsetup) to folder on internal storage
use ES File Explorer android app to get game folder path
Open ags app and in preferences set the file path of the folder which contains the game folder (for me it's SD card - AGS)
GuardDuty folder now shows in the app.

My acsetup.cfg has 'driver=OGL' listed under [graphics], is that correct? Is there a specific setup you need in the cfg?

Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: 15 Mar 2018, 14:54 »
Hey CW, sounds like you're making good progress. Just thought I'd mention that the link doesn't work atm.

Really can't wait to explore this world, everything looks so convincing! It really feels like all of these locations are part of the same gritty city, great work Fransico!

A new screenshot for you fine folk :)

What ferocious beast has our dear hero uncovered? Tondbert helps save one of the Knights of Wrinklewood in his epic quest to find Princess Theremin.

Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: 19 Feb 2018, 19:26 »

After that I finally managed to create Android APK for AGS 3.4.1:

Getting 'App not installed. The package appears to be corrupt.' when installing the .apk on my phone, can anyone else confirm this is a problem with the apk and not just me doing something wrong?


Also, that sounds great Joseph DiPerla! ;-D

Just wanted to say that I played through this and it's a really unique experience, I went into detail in my Steam review but I can't recommend it enough for fans of David Lynch or the 'melancholic horror' genre in general. It's super creepy without shoving excessive gore in your face, great work Shaun!

Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: 19 Feb 2018, 12:05 »
everything builds now!

Woo! Nice work guys ;-D Thank you both for your hard work with this. Exciting!

There are a lot of people who would benefit from this, keep it up :)

AGS Games in Production / Re: Feria d'Arles
« on: 15 Feb 2018, 14:52 »
Ohh, lovely to see a bit more of this project, the story sounds really interesting. (nod) Excited to play!

Engine Development / Re: AGS engine Android port
« on: 07 Feb 2018, 03:06 »
Good work guys, it's exciting seeing your progress even if I don't understand half the stuff :)

Here's a caveat though: such APK is not prepared for 3.4.1 yet, because of the issues with building one (hopefully temporary).

CW, is there a thread in which we can read about this, or can you elaborate a little? Building to android is definitely something I want to do in the future and it would be pretty tragic if upgrading the 3.4.1 has prevented that.

Great work all, now just eagerly awaiting the update for mobile ports 8-)

That really means a lot xBRANEx, music to my ears ;-D

Your voice was great Spook! Thanks for helping a brotha out :=

Also thanks for your continued support Creamy!

Clucking? :=

Thanks guys! :-*

Hello again!

I'm really bad at keeping this thread updated, far too busy making the game! :-D

Anyway, since my last post I've released a new 'Behind the Gates' video. This one
takes a look back at AdventureX and shows some of my 3D - Pixelart workflow that
I've been using for creating one of the animated SciFi scenes, the one seen in this gif:

Also, here's Guard Duty's stand at AdventureX :)

You can watch the video at the link below:


I've also recently written a new Development Retrospective post over on my
Tumblr blog, talking about the move to full time development and a few of my thoughts
 on how this has affected development:


On top of that I have a few updated screenshots for you! The game is always improving, sometimes
these changes are minor and some are a bit more significant. Can you spot the differences?
(hint: our SciFi antagonist has had a bit of an overhaul!)

Here's the updated screenshots from our latest press pack:


Oh, we also have a new shiny logo for the game. I'm still tweaking it but I think it gets
the theme of the game across a lot better than the last:


Last but not least, SilverSpook recently invited me onto his podcast! We chat about gamedev
and cyberpunk 8-)


Phew! That really was a lot of stuff, I apologise to your internet provider. Hopefully the shiny new screenshots are worth the download :)

Thanks again for all of your support, be it on twitter, facebook, discord or here on the forums. We couldn't do this without you guys!

Please follow along on Twitter or Facebook if you'd like more regular updates on the game.


General Discussion / Re: Silver Spook Podcast
« on: 16 Jan 2018, 12:10 »
Hey, thanks for the chat Chris! Was fun rambling about cyberpunk and gamedev ;-D

Nice work Dave ;-D

  • We live in a society where attention spans are very low.
I hate it when people say this. Attention spans were much lower when I was a kid than they are now.

Back when I was a kid, you would play a game for about fifteen minutes, maybe an hour at most, then switch to another game. Usually going through about ten games in a day if not more, and eventually returning to those games the next day. Nowadays though, people play the same game (and no other) for months, even years. Plenty of people are still playing Breath of the Wild, and that game came out a year ago.
Games are now starting to be marketed more as services than products, with a constant stream of updates and DLC, to keep you invested and playing. If attention spans were lower than ever, then that business strategy wouldn't be working.
I mean, just look at Minecraft! That game came out years ago, and it's still very relevant with loads of people still playing it!

Attention spans are very VERY high nowadays. Much higher than they were when I was a kid. But all anyone ever does is talk like an old man saying things like "Back in my day kids used to talk to each other!" Not realizing that people probably do that much more now than they had ever done before (after all, what do you think they're doing on those phones of theirs).

An open world RPG with platforming elements is just about as far away as you can get from a point and click, my comments were in relation to the topic.

Sure people play BotW for a long time, any time the player is stuck (having trouble completing the shrine puzzles or mini-bosses) they can just walk away and do a plethora of other tasks. That's exactly the reason it's so popular, there are so many choices of where to go and what to do - hence the buzzword 'open world'.

Adventure games (in the traditional PnC sense) are very linear and have little opportunity for doing other things when the player is presented with a block in progression, they require persistence from the player that is often missing from modern titles.

Maybe we come from different backgrounds, when I was a kid we did not have 10 games available to us in one day!

Here's my thoughts on the matter.

Let's look at this objectively:

  • The gaming industry is 100x larger than it was in the 80s/90s. This is considering the industry as a whole, including those casual gamers playing titles on mobile devices.
  • A very small percentage of that number are those who 'grew up' with point and click adventures.
  • A larger industry means more potential for sales, also more potential to get lost in the crowd of new releases.
  • We live in a society where attention spans are very low.
  • The core gameplay (or player interaction) of a point and click is driven by puzzles, something that requires a lot of patience and commitment from the player.
  • The majority of popular mobile and AAA games require little to zero effort from the player in regards to understanding narrative, let alone puzzles.
  • Media has become increasingly gratifying with the introduction of affordable CGI and improved *dramatic* narratives in television, a large majority are not prepared to invest in slow burning narrative (see above)
  • As time passes, less people are logging onto a PC when they get home. Average families favour sitting back on the sofa and playing mobile/console games, often with television running in the background.
  • Due to the lack of responsive gameplay, most point and click titles can be equally enjoyed by watching Let's Play videos.
  • We are in an age where most people are now used to googling problems they encounter in life, why would this be any different for puzzles in a video game?
  • A great deal of Point and Click games released are 'low-res' and the work involved in creating a higher resolution game requires a large team of very talented artists.
  • Low-res games are often overlooked by the larger majority of gamers and higher resolution point and click games are generally not financially viable for indie developers.
  • Most popular low-res games will have a unique gameplay mechanic not seen in AAA titles, often skill-driven gameplay.
  • The indie game market is over saturated but very healthy (and a viable option) in comparison to 10 years ago.
  • There is still a very strong and dedicated community of fans of this genre, let us not forget that.
  • People buy adventure games for the story, first and foremost - something that is very hard to convey in marketing media.
  • Quality visuals can go a long way when promoting a game on social media, try to tie this into the story.
  • People still buy adventure games.

This is coming from someone who is making a 'classic' LucasArts style point and click whilst trying to be mindful of recent trends in both indie and AAA gaming. I think we should be respectful of the merits of the genre and try to adapt this to a modern market.

Maybe a more constructive discussion would be 'What is right with the adventure games genre?'

Engine Development / Re: Let's build for Android!
« on: 09 Jan 2018, 17:03 »
Ah, drat. Can't win 'em all. Looking forward to that CW, your efforts with the OpenGL side of things have been very much appreciated.

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