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Messages - Mandle

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 315
1
The Rumpus Room / Re: What's on TV?
« on: Today at 23:22 »
Weird Gang   Odd Squad?  :smiley:

Winner!!!

2
The Rumpus Room / Re: What's on TV?
« on: Today at 15:37 »
Is this thread just dead or does nobody know this show?

I watched the first two episodes with a 4-year-old student today over lunch and she totally understood the concept of zeros being used to build larger numbers.

The genius of the episode is that they teach this by showing large numbers of vital things being reduced by factors of ten every time the "number hog" villain steals a zero, instead of showing an increase in value. Little kids grasp the concept of reduction much better than the concept of growth. They understand what having something taken away from them means to them: It sucks!

There is also a subplot where one of the main characters is about to turn 10 years old tomorrow but has the zero stolen from his birthday card so he will be a one-year-old baby again if they can't solve the case. So it gets personal!

Also, I love the stereotyped angry chief's comment of "I'm too young for this."

3
Yes

Was the soil in the pot moist?
Was he the only victim in the property?
Was the soil in the pot on the floor? (Some spilled on the floor, yes)
Was the plant itself still in the pot?
Does the plant have flowers? (It is a sunflower, yes)


No

Was the detective killer?
Was the man known to the detective?
Was there mud from the pot on the victim?
Did the detective think that was not the scene of the crime because there was not any soil on the victim from the overturned pot?
Are there any footprints in the soil?


To avoid wild goose chases I'm just going to move any questions that would have no bearing on the solution to a list called:

Irrelevant

Are there any traces of blood in the room?
Did the victim bleed as he died?
Does the victim have any extraordinary body features? (fat, huge, etc)?
Was the knocked over lamp only lamp in the room?
Was the TV turned on?
Is the broken leg to the coffee table missing?
Could it have been used as the weapon?
Had there been an earthquake 10 hours prior?
Were the curtains anywhere to be seen?
Was he clothed?
Did the detective expect soil to be dry?
Is there a clock in the room?
Is there a safe in the wall where the painting fell from?
Was the lamp switched on?
Is there any neon signs that could have lit up the room?
is the painting torn?

4
Case#56: The Unwelcome Detective

3:35 PM:

As you enter the room, the scene of the crime, the policemen scowl but back away and allow you access.

The deceased lies on the floor. He has been beaten to death it seems: He has massive bruising to his head and upper body.

Looking around the room you take in the mess that seems to have happened during the struggle, illuminated by the afternoon sunlight shafting in through the large uncurtained windows of the apartment:

The TV screen has been smashed.
The coffee table has been overturned and one of its legs has broken off.
A potted plant lies on its side on the floor.
A lamp has been knocked over and the bulb is broken.
A painting has fallen from the wall and lies face-down on the floor.
The sofa has been knocked out of position as evidenced by the dents in the carpet its legs left behind.
The bookcase has fallen, spilling books across the floor.
 
The police coroner tells you that the victim died about 10 hours ago.

You immediately tell the police inspector in charge that this is not the scene of the murder.

How did you know?


You may now investigate anything mentioned in the above description of the crime scene and more detailed information will be provided.

An example post: "Is the plant's pot cracked or otherwise broken?"

To which the answer would be: "No"

Up to five questions per person per post will be answered.

The game is afoot!

Yes

Was the soil in the pot moist?
Was he the only victim in the property?
Was the soil in the pot on the floor? (Some spilled on the floor, yes)


No

Was the detective killer?
Was the man known to the detective?
Was there mud from the pot on the victim?
Did the detective think that was not the scene of the crime because there was not any soil on the victim from the overturned pot?
Are there any footprints in the soil?


To avoid wild goose chases I'm just going to move any questions that would have no bearing on the solution to a list called:

Irrelevant

Are there any traces of blood in the room?
Did the victim bleed as he died?
Does the victim have any extraordinary body features? (fat, huge, etc)?
Was the knocked over lamp only lamp in the room?
Was the TV turned on?
Is the broken leg to the coffee table missing?
Could it have been used as the weapon?
Had there been an earthquake 10 hours prior?
Were the curtains anywhere to be seen?
Was he clothed?
Did the detective expect soil to be dry?
Is there a clock in the room?
Is there a safe in the wall where the painting fell from?

5
The Rumpus Room / Re: The funny pics thread? :)
« on: Today at 12:23 »
HOLY SHIT! I soooo want this action figure!


6
The Rumpus Room / Re: Happy Birthday Thread!
« on: Today at 03:44 »
Happy birthday to IHarvestBrains!

7
Wow, SilverSpook, your life sounds like "The Mosquito Coast" of game devs. Amazing read!

8
Yes

Was the soil in the pot moist?
Was he the only victim in the property?
Was the soil in the pot on the floor? (Some spilled on the floor, yes)


No

Was the detective killer?
Was the man known to the detective?
Was there mud from the pot on the victim?


To avoid wild goose chases I'm just going to move any questions that would have no bearing on the solution to a list called:

Irrelevant

Are there any traces of blood in the room?
Did the victim bleed as he died?
Does the victim have any extraordinary body features? (fat, huge, etc)?
Was the knocked over lamp only lamp in the room?
Was the TV turned on?
Is the broken leg to the coffee table missing?
Could it have been used as the weapon?
Had there been an earthquake 10 hours prior?
Were the curtains anywhere to be seen?
Was he clothed?
Did the detective expect soil to be dry?

9
Yes

Was the soil in the pot moist?

No

Was the detective killer?

To avoid wild goose chases I'm just going to move any questions that would have no bearing on the solution to a list called:

Irrelevant

Are there any traces of blood in the room?
Did the victim bleed as he died?
Does the victim have any extraordinary body features? (fat, huge, etc)?
Was the knocked over lamp only lamp in the room?
Was the TV turned on?
Is the broken leg to the coffee table missing?
Could it have been used as the weapon?

10
I will then:

Case#56: The Unwelcome Detective

3:35 PM:

As you enter the room, the scene of the crime, the policemen scowl but back away and allow you access.

The deceased lies on the floor. He has been beaten to death it seems: He has massive bruising to his head and upper body.

Looking around the room you take in the mess that seems to have happened during the struggle, illuminated by the afternoon sunlight shafting in through the large uncurtained windows of the apartment:

The TV screen has been smashed.
The coffee table has been overturned and one of its legs has broken off.
A potted plant lies on its side on the floor.
A lamp has been knocked over and the bulb is broken.
A painting has fallen from the wall and lies face-down on the floor.
The sofa has been knocked out of position as evidenced by the dents in the carpet its legs left behind.
The bookcase has fallen, spilling books across the floor.
 
The police coroner tells you that the victim died about 10 hours ago.

You immediately tell the police inspector in charge that this is not the scene of the murder.

How did you know?


You may now investigate anything mentioned in the above description of the crime scene and more detailed information will be provided.

An example post: "Is the plant's pot cracked or otherwise broken?"

To which the answer would be: "No"

Up to five questions per person per post will be answered.

The game is afoot!

11
The Rumpus Room / Re: I'M the boss!
« on: 15 Jan 2018, 23:17 »
Congratz!!!

Now, no getting greedy and skimming the profits products.

You'd end up looking like this guy:


12
Check the x/y of cHenchman to see if he's reached his point, then play the animation.

Code: Adventure Game Studio
  1. function repeatedly_execute_always()
  2. {
  3.  
  4.   if (henchman_patrolling == 1 && cHenchman.View == 214) {
  5.     cHenchman.Walk (225, 300, eNoBlock, eWalkableAreas);
  6.    
  7.         if (cHenchman.x == 225) {
  8.             cHenchman.LockView (21);
  9.             cHenchman.Animate (0, 5, eOnce, eNoBlock);
  10.         }
  11. ...
  12.  

Edit: This will mean the animation keeps happening, but you can stop that happening.

Doesn't it just need "henchman_patrolling = 0;" after "if (cHenchman.x == 225) {"

Either way, this is the exact way to do what you want: Check for waypoints in the patrolling NPC's x/y coordinates and slot in animations when they have reached them.

If you have any problems with NPCs not being pixel-perfect on the waypoint then you can use something like "if x>400 && x<410..." kinda thing.

Timers would get too messy.

13
The Rumpus Room / Re: The Movie Quote Game
« on: 15 Jan 2018, 14:58 »
Over to you!

14
I'll just add a small opinion here:

I think that one of the reasons we love adventure games is that feeling of having figured something out that was not immediately obvious.

That rush you got when you realized shining the flashlight on the bats in The Dig would panic them (God, I was stuck for soooo long before I suddenly remembered that Brink hates bats and that I had a way to wake them up)... Those moments are golden!

But I've watched many experienced gamers on YouTube calling adventure games the "What the fuck do I do now?" genre of games.

When the first Zelda game was pitched nobody at Nintendo understood what it was even supposed to be. It was a character standing on a screen where nothing was going on.

They asked "What happens next?" and Shigeru Miyamoto said "Nothing, until the player moves around and makes something happen."

This was unheard of! At this point games were all about the player reacting to what was happening on the screen. There was no such thing as a game where the player acts and the game reacts to that.

And now I think we have regressed a bit where a lot of the more popular games are, at their core, more player reaction than player action.

Even "open world" games often have their "quest pointers" showing you exactly where to go and a notebook system to tell you exactly what to do when you get there.

People play these "lead me by the nose" games and feel like they are on some grand adventure but really, for me at least, this is not a game. It's a movie where you have to click now and then to get it out of pause mode.

It seems more and more gamers want to be hypnotized into a zen-like state of click for the easy payoff rush as a replacement for the actual magical feeling of having figured something out for themselves. Or they are happy to watch a movie where sometimes they have to click the triangle button before the timer runs out before the next scene starts.

That all being said: An adventure game has to be really, really well designed to avoid the "figure out what the author was thinking" syndrome that others have mentioned above and only about 1 in 100 do this.

But still, I really hate the kind of games that just provide the easy fix of false achievement.

Maybe I'm just getting old and grouchy.

15
The Rumpus Room / Re: What's on TV?
« on: 15 Jan 2018, 13:58 »
Another screenie showing the main characters:



This is a show I discovered while I was in Australia and I became quite the fan!

Obviously it's a show for kids, and an educational one at that, and aimed at an audience of 5-7 year olds, but the quality of the acting, writing, and production really grabbed me and I ended up watching it quite a bit and had a lot of laughs and also a lot of fun figuring out what the "lesson" was in each episode before it was revealed.

Best show for little kids since Blue's Clues in my opinion. Also I think adventure game fans would have fun with it trying to figure out the puzzles before the agents solve them. There was one where whatever was placed on a table disappeared until they put two things at the same time and then they didn't. Then they tried putting one more thing and everything disappeared. Then one of the restaurant owners jumped onto the table to try to save the things and he disappeared. And that's when the agents got their first lead but they had to be careful not assuming too much or they would never get the guy back. It explains the scientific method on this kind of level that really little kids can grasp.

And so many tropes! The agents even have a boss who is always angry and shouting at them all the time when they mess up, and she is adorable!

It's basically The X-Files for little kids and it is awesome!

16
The Rumpus Room / Re: Can you solve this riddle?
« on: 15 Jan 2018, 11:06 »
Because you'd always get short changed?

17
The Rumpus Room / Re: The Movie Quote Game
« on: 15 Jan 2018, 07:28 »
No...

Another line from the same character:

"Never compromise, not even in the face of Armageddon."

18
The Rumpus Room / Re: Can you solve this riddle?
« on: 14 Jan 2018, 23:46 »
not sure but I would guess it would have something to do with "eagles"

Yeah.

Because he can always get a couple of eagles.

19
Wow! What an awesome job of recreating the interior rooms!

I can see Zero-Bit's backside!

20
The Rumpus Room / Re: Can you solve this riddle?
« on: 14 Jan 2018, 22:53 »
Here is an original Lord of the Rings riddle/joke that I came up with:
 
"What is the legal drinking age in Middle Earth?"

Here's one I came up with a while ago:

"Why is Gandalf good at golf?"

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