Author Topic: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick  (Read 1409 times)

Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« on: 30 Aug 2019, 14:43 »
I always try to search for perspective tricks, but it's hard to find material on the topic. But I found this article recently:

https://soranews24.com/2019/06/11/manga-artist-raises-question-online-about-false-perspective-in-ghibli-film-my-neighbor-totoro/

Apparently this picture cause some discussion (Also from the link, someone pointed out even the floor perspective is off):



Usually when I do multiple vanishing point on the same horizon line, it's done for a scrolling background.
Do you guys have any insight or thoughts on the tricks that was used for this scene?
« Last Edit: 30 Aug 2019, 15:28 by Yitcomics »

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Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #1 on: 30 Aug 2019, 19:55 »
I don't know much about art rules, but I think two point perspective is considered acceptable in some cases.

The artist probably went with what looks good.

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Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #2 on: 31 Aug 2019, 14:02 »
It's also a run-down old house in a country where wooden houses are designed to bend with earthquakes instead of ripping themselves apart. Maybe the angles of every room don't square out close to 90 degrees at every corner?

I used to live in a house that was about 80 years old and of very similar construction to the one in the picture. Nothing lined up! It was impossible to even get two people to agree if a picture was hanging level on the wall as they were looking at different reference points to make the judgement.

For Totaro they used a lot of drawing over photos to do the art so this could be a paintover of a room in an actual house.

Just sayin'

Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #3 on: 02 Sep 2019, 10:45 »
Wow, this looks like a really cool way to draw a wide space! Mostly, in my opinion, one point perspective used for indoor scenes makes the perspective look a bit exaggerated. I haven't seen the movie yet, but from the description in link it's a scene where the girls happily explore their new home - using this technique, the house actually looks more spatious.

Drawing in the vanishing lines for one point perspective shows how much the scene benefits from using two vanishing points!  :)

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Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #4 on: 25 Oct 2019, 12:02 »
Interesting discussion, and two-point perspective is perfectly valid imho. Perspective is just one of many artistic choices in an image. A game like Monument Valley https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ustwo.monumentvalley&hl=en_US is a good example of conscious use of impossible/counter-intuitive/Escheresque perspectives (even gameplay-wise.)

Also reminded me of this video of David Hockney discussing use of perspective in an old Chinese painting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrFDGct4kH8 I think many similar perspective tricks could probably be found in games, where it's sometimes important to bend the rules of physics/perception a bit for a better presentation.

Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #5 on: 23 Dec 2019, 14:09 »
I think that the "points" in the two-"point" perspective are a red herring: Let's suppose that a table was standing freely in the room somewhere, parallel to the walls - would the table sides line up with the left perspective point or with the right one? Probably neither - it'd need to be a third point in between. So I agree with those that say that the perspective "point" is a continuum in the picture. That's why the floor lines meet in a point that is neither the left nor the right wall.

What's more interesting is _why_ you'd want to do that in the first place: AFAICS, what it does specifically is it exaggerates the way that distant objects are tinier that near objects. So when that older girl runs into the foreground in a way that corresponds to this perspective, she'll downright "explode". This was probably the effect the animator wanted to achieve.

We can reproduce that "exploding" effect in AGS by using a walkable area with an exaggerated minimum and maximum scaling level. But would that be wise? Usually the characters stay in the room for a while and walk to the front and to the back repeatedly -- making them constantly "explode" and "implode". Not so good. So for designing a background in an adventure, I'd rather use the trick in the exact opposite way, making the left wall lines meet in a perspective point that is to the _left_ of the point of the right wall. I can then use a walkable area that _attenuates_ the "exploding" effect. That works best if the viewport is smaller than the room so that the player can't see both room sides at the same time and get wise on the trick.
« Last Edit: 23 Dec 2019, 14:11 by fernewelten »

Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #6 on: 23 Dec 2019, 14:53 »
AFAICS, what it does specifically is it exaggerates the way that distant objects are tinier that near objects. So when that older girl runs into the foreground in a way that corresponds to this perspective, she'll downright "explode".

No -- come to think of it, the exact opposite is true. If you move the perspective points out, the floor and ceiling lines of the side walls will become steeper and so the exploding effect will become more extreme. By moving the perspective points in so that the left wall lines meet in a point that is to the right of the point for the right wall, the floor and ceiling lines are flatter and the "exploding" effect is attenuated.

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Re: Studio Ghibli Perspective Trick
« Reply #7 on: 12 Feb 2020, 09:23 »


« Last Edit: 12 Feb 2020, 10:05 by Monsieur OUXX »